Love Pain Love

¿Qué se traerán entre manos?

madridfree:

Poco sabemos de esta secreta e inédita obra. Por eso quizás no vais a encontrar mucha información nueva respecto a otras webs. Por ejemplo, sabemos quiénes son sus creadores: Ricardo Castella y Ángel Martín. Dos caras conocidas de la televisión española, de los programas de humor y de los escenarios de monólogos. Ellos son los que han ideado  Love Pain Loveque ellos definen como una comedia romántica musical acerca de que lo más bonito es el amor y que te rompan el corazón ya ni te cuento. 

love pain love2

Ryan y Natalie parecen ser los protagonistas de la obra, desafortunados en el amor. Cuando lees que Kira Miró y Antonio Molero podrían andar por el teatro empiezas a sospechar con su presencia, pero en verdad no sabemos nada seguro. Es más, ellos mismos definen la obra, de momento, como una versión beta. Sabemos, eso sí, que tendremos seis funciones en Madrid para resolver nuestras dudas. Serán los días 20 y 27 de mayo, y 3, 10, 17 y 24 de junio en el Teatro Maravillas (Manuela Malasaña 6, Metro Bilbao). Las entradas cuestan sólo 10 euros y se pueden comprar aquí.

¿Qué se traerán entre manos?

La entrada Love Pain Love aparece primero en MadridFree.

worncreative:

For Millennials, The Future of Music Has Come Full Circle
The bedroom wall of 22-year-old Genna Tardi is covered in music-related posters and Rolling Stone covers. Sprawled on the floor is her extensive vinyl collection which has accumulated over the last six years—genres ranging from rock to bluegrass to jazz—and against the wall are speakers that project their distinct sound. Today she takes an afternoon to relax and discuss her take on the nature of the consumption of music in such a time of digitalization. 
“I’ve always preferred the sound of vinyl, and I think it’s an important way to have a connection to music,” Tardi says while seated on her paisley bed spread. “I still have iTunes, but if I could solely listen to music on vinyl, I would.”
Read More

worncreative:

For Millennials, The Future of Music Has Come Full Circle

The bedroom wall of 22-year-old Genna Tardi is covered in music-related posters and Rolling Stone covers. Sprawled on the floor is her extensive vinyl collection which has accumulated over the last six years—genres ranging from rock to bluegrass to jazz—and against the wall are speakers that project their distinct sound. Today she takes an afternoon to relax and discuss her take on the nature of the consumption of music in such a time of digitalization. 

“I’ve always preferred the sound of vinyl, and I think it’s an important way to have a connection to music,” Tardi says while seated on her paisley bed spread. “I still have iTunes, but if I could solely listen to music on vinyl, I would.”

Read More

(Source: wornmagazine)

Loving the new issue of the Collective Qtrly! 
“First, he understood the basic rule of reporting: always go. He went to places that were inaccessible and dangerous and miserable—not as a daredevil or adrenaline junkie, not recklessly, often reluctantly, always with the most meticulous and careful planning—but he knew you had to be there. You had to see it.”
As storytellers, we believe in the power of observation. Don’t rely on second-hand information. Don’t just call someone. And certainly don’t read about it on the Internet.

Always go.

Averiguar. (v.) To find out; to ascertain.

 

A good friend of mine Emily Littleton once told me this was her word that defined every action she made. She got it tattooed on her, she lives it. To me it really means to never be satisfied, which I try to live by as well. That may seem like a bad thing to some people, but I find it very stimulating to be curious, to know that I don’t know everything, and to have a different part of my mind opened when I find something out. 

These photos are from a trip I’ve been taking to Isla Mujeres, Mexico every May. Isla Mujeres is a small island only accessible by boat off the coast of Cancun. A huge attraction for shark fishing it is home to one of the most breathtaking beaches, and at just over 5 miles long and 1/2 mile wide in size it is also home to one of the largest concentration of poverty per capita in Mexico.

Here are some images I captured from my time working with the Smile Foundation this past summer. We just claimed non-profit government status this year, but the project started long ago.

Ms. Wynne Freeman, a Spanish teacher from Fairhope, AL took her class there on a field trip about 12 years ago only to be turned upside down with a desire to come back and do something more. A dentist from Birmingham, Dr. Lauten Johnson, got on board and before you know it there are almost 20 of us serving medically, translating and most recently repairing homes and hearing stories.

When our friends on the island know we are coming into town, they walk from one end of the island with their children, barefoot, rain or shine to get their tooth yanked out because they know they could die from the diseases it is causing if they don’t. With no air conditioning in a room about the size of a normal kitchen our team saw just under 1,000 patients in just 5 days.

The last photo comes from a story that impacted me the most. Having no dental or medical background or interest, I help serve as a coordinator and translator. I go into the villages and speak with the people to see whoneeds free medical care,explain where we are from and if there is anything else I can do for them. 

The village we frequent is called Guadalupana. They call this the “squatters land” of Isla Mujeres. An area that people who feel are “put out” my the government go to reside, find any materials they can to build a roof over there head, and stay there to be untouched.

One woman in particular I will never forget. Jenny. These are her two daughters. Jenny. is blind and is trying to maintain a home (a piece of tarp covering one hammock that they all three sleep in) and raise her two bright young girls. 

She asked for help repairing her roof because anytime it rained or got too hot (it is usually one or the other every day) they couldn’t sleep. What I saw when I went into her home was disturbing. There was rotting food strewn about everywhere, a “shower” and “sink” in one corner of the dirt hut was an old hose and a bucket (filled with feces that she thankfully couldn’t see,) and an old bathtub was in her front yard collecting mildew-y rainwater that she used to rinse their clothes in. We brought back some clothes, some food to keep them for a while and our team to pick up hammers that we bought at the zippy mart, and give her a new structure that could last until we came back this year.

In almost two months we will be back to Isla, but with a greater and more widespread desire to hear the stories of people like Jenny and find a way to make a more permanent change on a larger number of people.

There are so many stories like Jenny’s, but until we saw that one hammock house and picked up a hammer to put a roof on top of it, there was no way to fathom living in poverty, blind and raising two children.

 

When The Wind Blew Hard

amhoran:

image

Suddenly I’m awake at 5:00 a.m., cotton mouthed and clammy. Oftentimes, when I drink a little too much, I’m reprimanded with an erratic sleep and absurdly early mornings. I could hear the wind outside begin its slow, howling crescendo, opposite the eerie silence within our building. Everyone…

The most incredible account from friend and US Peace Corps Volunteer in the Philippines, Andrew Horan. Thank you for sharing your experience from living through Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan). 

Aging.

What a negative connotation society has placed on this word, and what a beautiful thing it can be. Since you won’t listen to your mom, maybe you’ll take some advice from me, a young body with an old soul.

After watching my grandmother go blind from her macular degeneration from not wearing sunglasses when she was my age, or my mom lifting her temples to create a false face lift from not wearing sunscreen as a teenager in California, I’ve decided that there are some ways I can prevent getting older in every aspect: physically, spiritually, and mentally.

So here it goes; the 21-year-old’s guide to aging gracefully.

It takes 21 days to make or break a habit.

Maybe you’ve always wanted to try eating vegan? Start today. By day 21 you’ll be putting pinto beans on a salad instead of chicken, and liking it. This is the only piece of credible advice I’ve gotten from a doctor. As for the rest of the advice, you can just take my word for it.

Ask grandpa the war stories now.

Be open to the indisputable truths of life. We aren’t going to all be here forever, and mom, dad and great-grandma are going to be here shorter than you’d like.

Find some sort of faith.

I’m not telling you what to believe or how you should worship, but I’m telling you, believe in something. Time to yourself to ponder the world is what sets you free from the crap that can sometimes be called daily life.

Learn something new every day. This is as easy as picking up a newspaper.

Put down the iPhone at dinner.

I don’t care if it’s with your best friend and you’re eating on a picnic blanket, it’s just rude. In fact, take one day where you just don’t use the iPhone. What an equal blessing and curse technology has been in our generation. Stand out from the rest and try to check your phone only 50 times a day, not 75.

Go places and be different than everybody else.

A great mom put it the best when she once told me, “Go away and get educated. Come back to the South because you want to, not because you never left.”

Live in the moment.

Quit worrying so much! It may sound cliché, but the problems we face are far more menial than most of the world out there. Tomorrow’s going to come, no matter how bad today was.

Don’t settle.

You try your hardest not to break someone’s heart, why should you settle for someone who breaks yours?

Just once, go to Ms. Velda’s $5 palm reading with a girlfriend.

If anything, it will get you in a good mood. Let’s be honest, we all know she won’t tell you you’ll get fat when you’re older.

People in your life will come and go as you get older, but find a few relationships and work at them.

Those people in your life that you feel smarter around? Stay around them. It may not always be easy to call an old college friend in 5 years, but make the effort.

Deflect gossip and jealousy.

Let it just roll off your back like you’re wearing a repellant. Where have you ever gotten with gossip? It may be hard to be the bigger man all the time, but take the high road, and make it a habit.

Don’t let all your friends getting married at 22 scare you into a marriage you aren’t ready for.

Let them get married now. You have the rest of your life to be married to someone. Maybe you’ll be married for 60 years. Maybe you’ll get divorced. Either way, you’re going to have some fun bachelorette parties.

Take vitamins. Wear sunscreen on your face, neck and hands. Workout. Don’t smoke.

When you’re 50 and look 35, you’ll thank yourself.

Don’t let the day come where you say, I wish I’d done that.

Go do it, whatever it is! Is it study abroad in college? Save up your miles, go to Spain.

And finally, embrace getting older. Don’t fear the real world, no matter how old you are. You may be 40 and don’t know what you want to do with your life yet. Thrive on that.

Travel light. Live light. Share the light. Be the light.

Don’t let getting older make you old.